What's Showing | Latest Films

What's Showing | Latest FilmsWhat's Showing | Latest Films

New movies in cinemas this week reviewed by EG TheAge, the entertainment guide to plan your weekend and beyond.

The latest films, Hollywood blockbusters, locally made independent films.

Includes Oscar-nominated films, award-winning films.

Last updated: 29 November 2019

NEW THIS WEEK


BY THE GRACE OF GOD

(138 minutes) M

Francois Ozon's new film has the features which so often distinguish reality from fiction. It skips about without regard to the rules of narrative shapeliness, yet wherever it goes, it always circles back to the same point. The campaigners at the centre of the story are not victims. They're heroes, brave and determined enough to disrupt their lives to expose a criminal and the church, which allowed a priest's crimes to go on for so long. SH

KNIVES OUT

(111 minutes) M

On the night of his 85th birthday, mystery novelist Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) is found dead. The well-cast line-up of suspects includes Harlan's snooty older daughter (Jamie Lee Curtis), her feeble brother (Michael Shannon), their Instagram-famous sister-in-law (Toni Collette) and the family's smirking “black sheep” (Chris Evans). Sounds like a job for Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig). As a feat of narrative gymnastics, Knives Out sets the bar very high. JW

NOW SHOWING


BALLOON

(125 minutes) M

This story takes place in a small community in southern East Germany, where two families have constructed a home-made hot-air balloon. They are going to use it to cross the border at night into West Germany. This really happened. PB

DOWNTON ABBEY

(122 minutes) PG

It's 1927 and with King George V and Queen Mary coming to visit, Buckingham Palace's snooty staff are freezing the Downton familiars out of their own kitchen. When the TV series began in 2011, Lady Mary (Michelle Dockery) was a snob, but her sharp edges were gradually planed away. The same has happened to butler Barrow (Robert James-Collier ). SH

FISHERMAN'S FRIENDS

(111 minutes) M

Truth really is stranger than fiction for the basic facts of Fisherman's Friends are harder to believe than the made-up bits. The triumphant underdogs here are Cornish fishermen whose sea shanties turned them into Britain's unlikeliest pop stars. Danny (Daniel Mays) plays a talent manager who's also made himself very much at home in the village among the fishermen and their families. SH

HAPPY SAD MAN

(93 minutes) M

John, who's about 70, has had a long battle with bipolar disorder. He dresses in eccentric clothes and has a bright, infectious laugh, but his joy disappears quickly when director Genevieve Bailey trains her camera on his face. Happy Sad Man is about men and mental illness. The film rewards close viewing. PB

THE IRISHMAN

(209 minutes) MA

The Irishman is pure cinema and one of Martin Scorsese's jazziest, most difficult films, borrowing from many sources while riffing freely though often mournfully on the themes and techniques of his previous crime epics Goodfellas and Casino. Robert de Niro plays Frank Sheeran, an associate of union boss Jimmy Hoffa, played by Al Pacino. This slow-burning melodrama is organised around a single shocking moment. Much of the time Hoffa seems like the central personality, the one with the tragic arc. But ultimately the story belongs to Frank: a guy not much different from the rest of us, a sinner with an outside chance at redemption. JW

JOKER

(122 minutes) MA15+

Even before its release, audiences were primed to regard Joker as a serious work of art. It is an interesting cultural phenomenon but, whatever its pretensions, this is undeniably a comic book movie. Mentally ill sad sack Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix) is the Joker who doesn't know how to tell a joke and never learns. JW

JUDY

(118 minutes) M

In Hollywood's pantheon of doomed idols, Judy Garland is up there with Marilyn Monroe. Renee Zellweger's performance in British director Rupert Goold's film is an act of immersion, concentrating on Garland's last year. SH

OFFICIAL SECRETS

(112 minutes) MA15 +

It is 2003 and Katharine (Keira Knightley) works as a translator at Government Communications Headquarters in England ' the home of British signals intelligence. Prime Minister Tony Blair and US President George W. Bush are pushing for a war against Saddam Hussein when Katharine leaks a memo to a former colleague, who sends it on to a political activist before it lands with Martin Bright (Matt Smith), a reporter. PB

ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD

(161 minutes) MA15+

Midway through this Quentin Tarantino film Sharon Tate (Margot Robbie) goes to see her own movie, the 1968 spy spoof The Wrecking Crew. She slips off her go-go boots and smiles at her onscreen counterpart (the actual Tate, not Robbie) as if they were sharing a private joke. JW

PAIN AND GLORY

(114 minutes) MA15+

Spanish director Pedro Almodovar's latest film is a kind of anti-film about a world-famous filmmaker called Salvador Molla (Antonio Banderas). Most of it takes place in one apartment, the lead character can hardly walk given his back pain and he no longer wants to be part of the wider world. This is Almodovar as the lion in winter ' still powerful, still with plenty to say but wondering ‘how much longer?' PB

PAVAROTTI

(114 minutes) M

That Luciano Pavarotti is worthy of an in-depth documentary is indisputable. The doubt is that this is actually "in depth" , as enjoyable as it is. Director Ron Howard knows how to make us love the man as well as the extraordinary voice.

Theatre or Theater?
Theatre and theater are both nouns that mean a building, room, or outdoor structure for the presentation of plays, films, or other dramatic performances. Theatre is by far the preferred spelling in British English.

For the latest reviews go to theage.com.au/entertainment/movies

PAUL BYRNES (PB), SANDRA HALL (SH) & JAKE WILSON (JW)

To subscribe, visit digitaleditions.com.au

Theatre or Theater?
Theatre and theater are both nouns that mean a building, room, or outdoor structure for the presentation of plays, films, or other dramatic performances. Theatre is by far the preferred spelling in British English.

EG


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